Category Archives: Uncategorized

NIBBLES

B. GOOD INTRODUCES NEW HEALTHY WRAPS

  • BOSTON – B. GOOD introduces a new line of fresh handmade wraps to its diverse menu at all U.S. sites, says CEO Chris Fuqua who adds that the wraps come in two “flavor varieties” on a whole wheat tortilla and are preared in house fresh for each customer. They include:
  • Chicken Caesar ($8.49) – made with romaine, parmesan, and whole grain croutons, tossed in lemon-caesar vinaigrette, all wrapped in a whole wheat tortilla.

 

  • Southwest Chicken ($8.99) – made with mixed baby greens, avocado, toasted corn, tomatoes, black bean & corn salad with chipotle puree, and balsamic vinaigrette, all wrapped in a whole wheat tortilla.

 

The chain specializes in healthy, portable options as part of it’s commitment to serving “Food with Roots” – fresh, wholesome and sourced from local independent farmers. The new wraps are available starting at all U.S. B.GOOD stores, through delivery via DoorDash and GrubHub at participating locations, and on the B.GOOD catering menu later this month. For more information about B.GOOD, its menu offerings, and the new B.GOOD wraps, visit Bgood.com.

 

 

 

 

 

BevSpot and Toast integration set to help bars and restaurants succeed

BOSTON – A new partnership between BevSpot and Toast lets clients seamlessly use Toast POS data to make smarter ordering and inventory decisions and get quicker access to their business’ overall health.

 

The integration combines item-level POS data from Toast with inventory and ordering data available in BevSport without spreadsheets, uploads or exports. Sales data streams into the BevSpot account by selecting dates and new menu items flow into it automatically letting operators manage recipes and cost out beverages without creating them one by one.

 

Exact names and menu groups created in Toast will be used in BevSpot to offer consistency across the two platforms and provide clean data.
Restaurant and bar users receive an integrated solution and an exclusive hardware-software discount, getting the Toast Terminal Bundle and two months of the BevSpot pro subscription for free – getting an up to $2,000 value. Go to www.bevspot.com for more details.

 

NIBBLES

Costa Fruit and Produce offers food safety training

CHARLESTOWN, MA – Costa Fruit and Produce in the Bunker Hill Industrial Park here is offering food safety classes. The next is September 19th from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.  and will allow participants to attain ServSafe certification.

The class is $129 per person and includes a book, breakfast and lunch. If you are a foodservice manager, dietitian, director, chef, kitchen manager, or staffer, sign up to learn more about food protection. Contact Mike Scuderi at 617-912-8014.

 

 

Wine(s) of the Week

Sbragia Family Vineyards in Geyserville, CA offers several interesting wines – the 2012 Monte Rosso Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon from the Moon Mountain District and the 2014 Home Ranch Chardonnay. The first is a blend of 95 percent Cabernet Sauvignon, four percent Cabernet Franc and one percent Petit Verdot. The Sonoma County vineyard is on the southwest side of the Mayacamas mountain range with iron-rich soils. Adam and Ed Sabragia, third and fourth generation vintners, share several blocks of the vineyard with their friend Mike Martini whose family bought it in the late 1930s.

The Chardonnay from Dry Creek Valley’s Home Ranch Vineyard, offers note of ripe apples, tropical fruit and toasted almonds. On the palate, one finds apple and citrus  with acidity and a long finish. The suggested retail price is $30. The Cabernet, aged 24 months in new French oak, is from a classic mountain vineyards that produce rich and concentrated fruit and has a retail price of $65.

Sbragia Family Vineyard has been making wines for decades. Check it out at 9990  Dry Creek Road, Geyserville, CA and visit http://www.sbragia.com

 

Food allergies grow as public health issue

FARE (Food Allergy Research & Education) cites food allergies as a growing public health concern, noting that 15 million people are afflicted, 9 million of them adults and nearly 6 million children.
As long ago as 2008, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) reported a 50 percent increase in food allergies among children from 1997 to 2011. The economic cost of those allergies was estimated at nearly $25 billion annually.

Eight foods account for 90% of all food-allergic reactions: milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts (e.g., walnuts, almonds, cashews, pistachios, pecans), wheat, soy, fish, and shellfish. 5, 15, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 62 Estimated prevalence9, some based on self-report, among the U.S. population: o Peanut: 0.6-1.3%
o Tree nuts: 0.4-0.6%
o Fish: 0.4%
o Crustacean shellfish (crab, crayfish, lobster, shrimp): 1.2

o All seafood: 0.6% in children and 2.8% in adults

o Milk and egg: based on data within and obtained outside the United States, this rate is likely to be 1-2% for young children and 0.2-0.4% in the general population.
Managing Food Allergies

Eating away from home is said to potentially pose “a significant risk ” to those affected by food allergies. One study looking at peanut and tree nut allergy reactions in restaurants and other food establishments found that reactions were frequently attributed to desserts, that Asian restaurants and take-out dessert stores (bakeries, ice cream shops) were common sources of foods that triggered reactions, and that the food establishment was often not properly notified of a food allergy by the customer with the allergy.

Even small amounts of a food allergen can trigger a reaction. Food allergies are a leading cause of anaphylaxis outside the hospital setting, the group points out. It notes that every three minutes, a food allergy sends someone to a hospital emergency room, accounting for some 200,000 ER visits annually. Research shows that:

• Every six minutes the reaction is one of anaphylaxis. • Teenagers and young adults with food allergies are at the highest risk of fatal food-induced anaphylaxis.
• Symptoms of anaphylaxis may recur after initially subsiding and experts recommend an observation period of about 4 hours to monitor that the reaction has been resolved.
• Individuals with food allergies who also have asthma may be at increased risk for severe/fatal food allergy reactions.
• Children with food allergy are 2-4 times more likely to have other related conditions such as asthma and other allergies, compared with children without food allergies. 1
• It is possible to have anaphylaxis without any skin symptoms (no rash, hives). 1
• Failure to promptly (i.e., within minutes) treat food anaphylaxis with epinephrine is a risk factor for fatalities.

For more information, visit Food Allergy Research & Education http://www.foodallergy.org • (800) 929-4040